cnsedesigns.com: Great Sites

Anedra E. Media
Anedra E. Media is a brand that promotes art as an evolutionary medium. From video, to photography to web and graphic design, Anedra E. Media fuses different areas of the arts to create a high quality product.

CNSEDesigns Dotphoto
If you would like to purchase images that you have seen on this site, please follow thru to CNSEDesigns.Dotphoto. If images are not available please send email to Charles@CNSEDesigns.com

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Doleman Black Heritage Museum
The Doleman Black Heritage Museum (DBHM) is a non-profit organization located in Hagerstown, Maryland, focused on preserving and displaying the legacy of Charles & Marguerite Doleman’s vision of a state of the art cultural & historical museum depicting the lives of all African-Americans, situated in the heart of Hagerstown, Maryland. Whose mission is to collect, preserve, exhibit, and interpret historical
and cultural artifacts of African Americans in Washington County Maryland, to protect and expand the legacy of the Doleman family, to provide insight and enlightened knowledge for the public, and to serve as a resource for historical information of African-American history and culture locally and statewide.

Living Negro American, African and West Indian artists in Washin...
Original art, hand-pulled prints and sculpture by living Negro American, African and West Indian artists. Many of the artists hang in prestigious museums.

Mr. Wally Amos : the Cookie King
Wally Amos is the genuine, ebullient and gregarious father of the gourmet chocolate chip cookie. Who I had the privilege to meet in the hallways of a great University one afternoon, selling his new cookie after he lost his first company “Famous Amos Cookies “.Mr. Amos's baking hobby led him to open the world’s first cookie store in Los Angeles in 1975. Today, decades later, he’s still in business at Chip & Cookie®, Wally’s likeness is on the cover of Watermelon Credo: The Book “If enough people see my wrinkled old mug with a slice of watermelon, and wearing watermelon prints on clothing, how can they continue to see this fruit as a racial stereotype for shiftless, dumb and worthless blacks? Apart from being African American, I am none of those things, and anyone who can recognize my face will know that to be true.”
“All I have known with certainty,” Wally observes, “is that I love watermelon and really despise hatred.”

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